Monday, April 02, 2018

A Tribute to Winnie Mandela

Today, 2nd April 2018, Winnie Mandela, known as the mother of the nation during the struggle against apartheid in South Africa, the Iconic woman who held Mandela's memory up high the long years he was in prison, died at the age of 81. In 1987 at the height of South Africa's struggle, I wrote the following poem in Somali in celebration of her heroic campaign. It carried the title Amandala or power in Zulu which was Winnie's iconic defiant salute to the people. 


AMANDALA

Winniyeey habeenimo
Dabkaad hurisayee baxay
Hillaacii ka muuqdiyo
Hadawgii ka soo kacay
Hiinraagga beerkiyo
Guux halaanhalkaagii
Badda hooraheegiyo
Hirka soo jibaaxyoo
Hiirtaanyo weyniyo
Afrikada hammuuniyo
Holac weyn ku noolee

Hiyigii dalooshamay
Nabarkii hagaadee
Huuryadu ku noolayd
Soo celi hafeeftii

Himbiriirsi araggii
Heegadu dul saarnayd
Hummaaggii wax kala arag

Horaadkii qombobayee
Ilmuhu uu la huudmiyo
Hooyo naasaheegii
Haaneedki soo curay

Odayadu hillaabtii
Haaraysay dhabarkee
Qarniyaal dul hogatiyo
HAYEDII ka dootame

Hoobeeyadaadii
Carruurtii ku heestoo
Ubixii horseed noqoy

NELSON hiigsigiisii
Dayrka lagu hagoogiyo
Kuma huudmin jeelkoo
Gacantaada hodankaa
Markaad sare u hidiseed
Amandala ku heestaa
Shicibkii hongobee
Ciilkuu haleeliyo
Geeduhu hadleenoo
Dalku hooyo kaa dhigay

Anigana hammuuntii
Halgankaagu kiciyaa
Hollinaysa beerkoo
Magacaaga hiirtaan
Habeenkiyo dharaartii
Ku hammoonayaayoo

Hareeraha SOWETIYO
Hoygaaga BRADFORD
Yaan u heelanahayoo
Hambalyiyo salaaniyo
Ubax dhiig halyeey iyo
Haween gocashadoodiyo
Hadaaqii dhallaankiyo
Lagu habay xusuus baan
Kuula soo hagaagoon
Kuula soo habqamayaa.


Bashir Sh. Omer Good (Goth)
April 4, 1987

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Somali music through the ages by Bashir Goth, special for Music in Africa

From its groundbreaking origins in balwo, modern Somali music of the late 20th Century phased through many genres including heello, waddani, qaraami, benadiri, jazz, reggae and others. Although music will continue to be created by Somalis wherever they set foot in the world, it is undeniably the music of the 1960s through the 1980s that remains the epitome of the potential of Somali music, as it encapsulates the collective musical memory of the Somali people.

Read more in Music In Africa Magazine



 

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Africa’s democracy outgrows foreign preaching by Bashir Goth, Special to Gulf News

Kenyan polls is the first time that an African court invalidated the vote won by a sitting president based on the merits of the constitution and election law

Gulf News, 13 Sept. 2017--1For as long as anyone can remember, it has been the western world dictating the norms of democracy to Africa and the rest of the world. No matter the efforts by these countries, the West’s imposing standards of democracy were nearly impossible to achieve. Especially when those standards required witnesses and results endorsed by international observers. But not anymore.

Watching Chief Justice David Maraga’s powerful opening statement during his announcement of the Supreme Court’s historic decision to invalidate the Kenyan presidential elections held on August 8 and his call for fresh elections in 60 days, I could not help but recall the words of one of Africa’s independence icons and Cold War martyrs Patrice Lumumba.

In a letter from his prison cell to his son and by extension to Africa’s future generations, Lumumba said: “The day will come when history will speak. But it will not be the history which will be taught in Brussels, Paris, Washington or the United Nations. It will be the history which will be taught in the countries which have won freedom from colonialism and its puppets. Africa will write its own history and in both north and south it will be a history of glory and dignity.”

READ MORE in Gulf News

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Tuesday, August 01, 2017

The Artisan Grace - Poem about the Somali Gabooye by Bashir Goth

The following excerpt which I use as an introduction to the poem is from an article I wrote in 2007 about the status of the Gabooye community among the Somali people.

"They have no voice among us and no political representation. And if anyone of them dares to protest, we easily silence them by invoking the M-word. This makes every Somali around them flee and avoid them like a plague. Even in the national charter of the current Somali Transitional Federal Government they are nameless although they have taken a little better status by being referred to as the 'others' among small but respected Somali clans. This is the closest they have ever come to share a status albeit an insignificant one with other clans." (Link)

THE ARTISAN GRACE

Take a look, brother, a full look at me
An eyeful of the whole of me
Poke my skin hard, and pinch it if you will
Cut my flesh, deep into the blood and bone
Until I cry for I am not made of stone.

Can you see now?
That I shudder in pain?
Can you see my blood,
As red, as fresh as yours?
Can you see my bones,
And the marrow in plain?

READ MORE in Poem Hunter

Africa’s Singapore is slowly taking shape by Bashir Goth, Special to Gulf News

Published: 17:00 July 22, 201

Djibouti does not frequently feature in the headlines, but the leader of the tiny country in the Horn of Africa and his international partners recently touted this state of rock mountains, and extremely hot weather as the new Dubai, the Shekou of East Africa, and the rising African Singapore.

If it sounds difficult to imagine such a glowing future for a country which the Associated Press once dismissed as a place devoid of resources “except for sand, salt, and 20,000 camels”, think for a moment of the state of the Arabian Gulf metropolises in the early 60s which would in a mere 30 years transform from impoverished pearling villages into Arabian Manhattans. Djibouti is poised to transform in much the same way in a fraction of the time, if it takes advantage of this moment of opportunity.

READ MORE in Gulf News

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Why mainstream media failed to read people's hearts by Bashir Goth | Gulf News

What once was considered as conversation behind closed doors is now discussed in public, while civility and decency are trashed, and truth sacrificed at the altar of competition for profit and rating